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Life is a vapor. Don't spend yours on the sidelines.

Gichagi

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gichagi mapGichagi slum is home to over 10,000 people and sits inside the larger community of Ngong, which hosts approximately 60,000 residents. Ngong is a Maasai word meaning “knuckles” due to the 4 hill peaks of the ridge, which stands alone rising from the plain around Nairobi. Gichagi slum began during British rule when land was dedicated to displaced refugees. In time, disenfranchised and marginalized citizens from a variety of poverty stricken situations further settled Gichagi. Today, both extreme poverty (people surviving on less than $1 per day) and moderate poverty (people surviving on less than $2 per day) hold a tight grip on the residents of Gichagi slum. Vapor’s Gichagi center was established during 2009 to 2010, and is now having an amazing daily impact.

While the appetite for soccer in Gichagi is high, this region is also home to some of the world’s greatest runners. Because of Ngong's elevation and the rolling hills, it is a prime place for elite runners from all over to come and to train. A runners’ life in Gichagi is extremely difficult. The body needs proper care and sufficient nutrition in order to fully sustain the rigorous life of a training athlete. Many of the area's runners are faced with a scarcity of food and water, due to poverty, and are often separated from their families because of insufficient funds. Vapor’s center in Gichagi currently has around 450 young people ranging from 6 years old to 30 years old in its life-on-life discipleship leagues. Approximately 100 of these participants are involved in the running ministry, and approximately 350 are involved in the soccer leagues, varying from season to season. In 2009, Vapor’s Gichagi representatives, Brett & Trishia Ralston, led us to construct a track around the Gichagi center’s main pitch. The track sits at over 7,500 feet above sea level and is the highest elevation track in the area. Vapor’s center draws some of the world’s greatest runners—including multiple Kenyan Olympic athletes—for weekly training. Hundreds of people in the community are finding the hope of Christ as Vapor’s indigenous staff multiplies disciples.

Vapor’s daily outreach in Gichagi is led by Vinnie Okoth, along with Vapor’s indigenous staff comprised of 17 local employees and 15 local volunteers. Brett Ralston (currently serving Vapor as International Site Manager) and his wife, Trishia, fully transitioned the Gichagi center into indigenous staff’s hands in 2010. Vapor’s Gichagi center has several microbusiness projects coming, and is currently letting the track, facilities, and fields to professional athletes for training.

The African Inland Church of Ngong Hills is Vapor’s primary church partner in the area. The local body is led by indigenous African pastors and is overseen by an indigenous denomination called African Inland Church.

As with Vapor’s other centers, we are fighting illiteracy and sowing into many of the slum’s poorest through Vapor’s child sponsorship program called Hasmin’s Friends. This year, we anticipate around 450 young people will be participating in our basic disease-awareness education and disease-prevention training. Through Vapor’s Gichagi humanitarian aid fund, we’ve been able to assist hundreds of desperate residents in gap assistance. From job provision and medical support, to gap feeding assistance and hygiene training, Vapor is alleviating poverty on a daily basis in Gichagi.

Ngong boy 

"Ngong is truly ripe for the harvest with a sizable population searching and an impoverished people needing help."

Johnathon, Sylacauga, AL